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significantmelancholy:

nevver:

Where you feel it

bringing this back because important 

significantmelancholy:

nevver:

Where you feel it

bringing this back because important 

(via referencepictures)

simonist:

ive been thinking about a new way of sketching in/drawing joints— instead of thinking “upper arm, then elbow, then forearm” (this happens a lot for me when i go by the traditional sort of ball and stick way of constructing the body) it’s more of “upper arm, overlapping forearm

it’s kind of hard to explain but hopefully you’ll get what i mean from the pictures

stock for img and are from lalunatique

img 3 has some milt kahl hands and some from the iron giant

img 4 is an old drawing of mine that i tried to fix up using what i learnt here
(…okay, obviously, it’s still not the greatest thing ever but it’s still a far sight better now)

(via theprophetandtheliar)

wapiti3:

North American herpetology ;By Holbrook, John Edwards, 1794-1871 on Flickr.

Publication info Philadelphia :J. Dobson,1836-1840.
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

(via scientificillustration)

sixpenceee:

JOINTS IN MOTION

As said by IFL science

Cameron Drake of San Francisco has created a collection of magnificent images showing joints in motion. He was aided by orthopedic physician Dr. Noah Weiss and the finished product is completely amazing. If you’d like to know more about the project, please check out Drake’s blog.

(via thewhitebeast)

bonzly-says:

ohyeahcomics:

Via Schatky with thanks to Lickal0lli for the translation

This is actually such an amazingly motivational post because it explains visually exactly what art block is. Do you know what art block is?
Art block is that moment when you realise your skills could be so much more then they currently are. It frustrates you to draw because you can finally see your drawings differently. You can see where they can be better and you want them to be better. It’s not a matter of “I can’t draw today”, it’s a matter of “I imagined this would turn out so much better” and “there’s something missing, I just know it. What technique did I miss.” You’ve got past that temporary phase of analysing and researching and now you’re able to incorporate it in your own work, you just need to figure out how, and when you get past that art block. Well, you’ll see the improvement before you know it. Slowly, but it’s there. And once you get comfortable with using those new skills you’ll move on and start analysing again, and you’ll see where you can improve.
Stay experimental and open to learn, it’s the quickest way to get over art block.

bonzly-says:

ohyeahcomics:

Via Schatky with thanks to Lickal0lli for the translation

This is actually such an amazingly motivational post because it explains visually exactly what art block is. Do you know what art block is?

Art block is that moment when you realise your skills could be so much more then they currently are. It frustrates you to draw because you can finally see your drawings differently. You can see where they can be better and you want them to be better. 
It’s not a matter of “I can’t draw today”, it’s a matter of “I imagined this would turn out so much better” and “there’s something missing, I just know it. What technique did I miss.”
You’ve got past that temporary phase of analysing and researching and now you’re able to incorporate it in your own work, you just need to figure out how, and when you get past that art block. Well, you’ll see the improvement before you know it. Slowly, but it’s there. And once you get comfortable with using those new skills you’ll move on and start analysing again, and you’ll see where you can improve.

Stay experimental and open to learn, it’s the quickest way to get over art block.

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

memoircomics:

nannaia:

This is a hairstyle timeline that is meant to cover the Taishō era (1912-1926). However the dates for many reference photographs were rather vague, so some might actually fall into Shōwa era (1926-1989). Regrettably I couldn’t cover EVERY single hairstyle from this period so please consider this to be a brief overview. There are no Geisha, Maiko, etc featured here; they will be covered in another fashion timeline someday.

Some interesting notes about Meiji-Taisho era from Liza Crihfield Dalby’s Kimono: Fashioning Culture (1993)

·         “Men and women of Meiji had gulped up Western culture with all the indiscriminate enthusiasm of new converts. By Taishō, Japanese sensibilities vis-à-vis the West were much smoother. This was Japan’s political equivalent of the … social scene of the American Roaring Twenties. Japanese born during Taishō would enter adolescence as modern boys and girls. Significantly, women opened their closets to Western clothing during this decade. Kimono has lost space ever since.” (pg. 124)

·         “By 1915 Japan was beginning to feel itself a world-class nation, more confident of its military strength and social development. Ordinary Japanese were inclined to look at their society in light of how life might be bettered by adapting foreign ideas, or made more interesting by acquiring foreign fashions. Borrowing from the West was of course not new, but it had now become a more reciprocal and respectable process.” (pg. 124)

WOMEN’s HAIR:

·         In the Meiji era “a few women cropped their hair, but these courageous souls were simply regarded as weird” and indecent (pg. 75)

·         “If cutting the hair short was too radical [in Meiji Japan], as public reaction attests, women’s hair did gain a new option in the sokugami style, a pompadour resembling the chignons worn by Charles Dana Gibson’s popular Gibson girls. The further the front section, or ‘eaves,’ of the hair protruded, the more daring the style. The sokugami style bunched the hair, coiling it in a bun at the crown of the head. Unlike traditional coiffures, sokugami did not require the heavy use of pomade, pins, bars, strings, and false hair to hold its shape. Its appeal was promoted as healthier and more rational – hence, more enlightened- than the old ways.” (pg. 75)

the people in these photos are some of the most beautiful i’ve ever seen?!?!?!?!?!??!

captain-harrie:

i draw hands using lots of boxes???
oR WELL thats what im visualising in my head i actually jsut draw some vague bullshit

then build the hand from that

bUT the boxes are there in my head thats what im picturing
u should all practice hands using pixelovely for ref tho

Start learning to draw things by imagining and applying shapes that work for you (in this case boxes). Use these shapes as your own personal guidelines for now, and eventually you will be able to create the shape (the hand) by just imagining the shapes, and sketching out the rough. It’s like a superpower you grow.

captain-harrie:

i draw hands using lots of boxes???

oR WELL thats what im visualising in my head i actually jsut draw some vague bullshit

image

then build the hand from that

image

bUT the boxes are there in my head thats what im picturing

u should all practice hands using pixelovely for ref tho

Start learning to draw things by imagining and applying shapes that work for you (in this case boxes). Use these shapes as your own personal guidelines for now, and eventually you will be able to create the shape (the hand) by just imagining the shapes, and sketching out the rough. It’s like a superpower you grow.

(via art-help)