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/!\ WARNING /!\

anatomicalart:

Hello, I am Admin Bonzly of the Anatomicalart crew.

Just to let followers know, there are future posts in this blog’s queue which may be triggering to some viewers.
These images are ‘cross sections’ and disections of body parts reblogged for purely scientific purposes. We have tagged said images as ‘gore’ so if you are sensitive to images like these please consider blocking the tag.
Blocking tags is easy if you don’t already know how to do it, a simple google search for ‘How To Block Tumblr Tags’ should help you.

The image we post are rarely real gore, we try to find drawn references where and whenever possible because we are aware of user sensitivity.
Any tags featuring real dead bodies will be tagged ‘Cadaver’.

As a final piece of reassurance, any cadaverous images posted to this blog are scientific or official medical references.
Bodies fetured were donated post mortem, and consent was signed by the patients prior to their deaths.

This post may be re-posted at other hours of the day to inform other users.


/!\ WARNING /!\

anatomicalart:

Hello, I am Admin Bonzly of the Anatomicalart crew.

Just to let followers know, there are future posts in this blog’s queue which may be triggering to some viewers.
These images are ‘cross sections’ and disections of body parts reblogged for purely scientific purposes. We have tagged said images as ‘gore’ so if you are sensitive to images like these please consider blocking the tag.
Blocking tags is easy if you don’t already know how to do it, a simple google search for ‘How To Block Tumblr Tags’ should help you.

The image we post are rarely real gore, we try to find drawn references where and whenever possible because we are aware of user sensitivity.
Any tags featuring real dead bodies will be tagged ‘Cadaver’.

As a final piece of reassurance, any cadaverous images posted to this blog are scientific or official medical references.
Bodies fetured were donated post mortem, and consent was signed by the patients prior to their deaths.

This post may be re-posted at other hours of the day to inform other users.


/!\ WARNING /!\

Hello, I am Admin Bonzly of the Anatomicalart crew.

Just to let followers know, there are future posts in this blog’s queue which may be triggering to some viewers.
These images are ‘cross sections’ and disections of body parts reblogged for purely scientific purposes. We have tagged said images as ‘gore’ so if you are sensitive to images like these please consider blocking the tag.
Blocking tags is easy if you don’t already know how to do it, a simple google search for ‘How To Block Tumblr Tags’ should help you.

The image we post are rarely real gore, we try to find drawn references where and whenever possible because we are aware of user sensitivity.
Any tags featuring real dead bodies will be tagged ‘Cadaver’.

As a final piece of reassurance, any cadaverous images posted to this blog are scientific or official medical references.
Bodies fetured were donated post mortem, and consent was signed by the patients prior to their deaths.

This post may be re-posted at other hours of the day to inform other users.


biomedicalephemera:

Horizontal Sections of the Adult Male
Top-to-Bottom: Mid-section of skull, section at maxilla [hard palate between sections], section below mandible

Eugène-Louis Doyen was a revolutionary (if flamboyant and controversy-loving) Parisian surgeon who lived between 1859 and 1919.

Long before the Visible Human Project created its 1,871 “slices” of Joseph Paul Jernigan at 1 mm intervals, and created over 65 gigs of anatomical data (and later created 40 gigs of data with a female cadaver), Doyen presented a new way of visualizing the cadaver: longitudinal and horizontal sections, showing exactly how the human anatomy goes together in each area, without the context of seeing the full organs or bones.

Though the full usefulness of these unorthodox sections wasn’t truly appreciated until the advent of tomography in the early 1970s, they were noted to be helpful to early radiologists, and especially to the burgeoning fields of criminal forensics and forensic archaeology.

Atlas d’anatomie topographique. Eugène-Louis Doyen. 1911.

(via scientificillustration)

staceythinx:

Volume Rendering CT scans by voxel123 

(via manny-heatlook)

jenn2d2:

This 1863 image from the Wellcome Trust illustrates a distinctly vampiric set of “Syphilitic malformations of the permanent teeth” — makes you wonder if the visual image of the vampire was inspired by the widespread horrors of untreated syphilis (for an exceptionally visceral window into a society wracked by untreated syphilis, have a look at the Mutter Museum’s display of syphilitic skulls). (via Curiously vampiric teeth of untreated syphilis sufferers - Boing Boing)

jenn2d2:

This 1863 image from the Wellcome Trust illustrates a distinctly vampiric set of “Syphilitic malformations of the permanent teeth” — makes you wonder if the visual image of the vampire was inspired by the widespread horrors of untreated syphilis (for an exceptionally visceral window into a society wracked by untreated syphilis, have a look at the Mutter Museum’s display of syphilitic skulls). (via Curiously vampiric teeth of untreated syphilis sufferers - Boing Boing)

(via scientificillustration)

jaramo:

heyo!
don’t worry, your english turned out fine, dude.

as a foreword of warning,
it is best that you don’t use this post as a standalone tutorial, 
instead, try to use it as a study aid to help you make sense of real-life references.
(same applies for any decent “art tutorial” out there, really. :p)

bolded numbers correspond to the numbers on this post’s pictures.

Read More

(via fairyorbitars)

asker

Anonymous asked: How do you draw a profile to match the front face? They end up becoming two different people...

zemael:

I used to have a lot of trouble with this myself until I figured out one simple trick. All you gotta do is know how to work with layers in a program like Photoshop, SAI, Manga Studio, etc, or have a ruler if you’re a traditional artist. 

  • 1. Let’s take a look at this dude. I drew the front of the face first and then tried to match the profile the best I could. Looking at it quickly it seems fine, doesn’t it? (well, other than the eyebrows; I forgot he was frowning.) But when you focus you can tell it looks.. well, off, compared to the one to the left.

  • 2. This part can be a bit tricky. Take each layer and change the lines to a different, contrasting color or make it a different opacity (or both) and then overlap them. To make it less confusing, put the layers as "multiply". This way you can see the lines without confusing them too much.  Try adjusting it to match as good as you can. Now when we have all the parts next to each-other, we can tell what’s wrong. The mouth is too high up, the nose is way too short, the eyes are also too high up, the forehead is too big, and the skull is too small. Thank goodness I at least got the neck and chin right! Let’s adjust these things so that they are at least the right height. (For you traditional artist, just use the ruler to measure the parts!)

  • 3. Now the most obvious things are fixed, and we can see a big improvement. Everything matches height-wise. Nothing is glaringly wrong, but there’s still some details that are off. if you look closely, you can see that the cheek doesn’t quite match up, as well as the eye-shape and the nose shape. Also the expression. (On another note, I made the skull on the blue one a bit smaller, just so you don’t get confused. I noticed it was an anatomy error)

  • 4. Fixed the minor details, and as you can see, there was a major difference. I’m going to make different tutorial on noses later on, but how do you know if a nose is down-turned or up-turned by looking at it from the front? Well, a down-turned nose is usually V-shaped, like the guy in my picture. An up-turned nose usually have more visible nostrils. Anyway. I’m happy with the results, let’s put the finished products next to each other.

  • Yep! We can tell it’s the same guy now. Small things make a huge difference, and this trick is really easy once you get used to it. It might feel a bit trippy at first with all the lines  clashing, but as I said, you get used to it. Let’s see the before-and-after.

  • Not quite the same dude.

But yeah, there you go! If you’re interested to see more of my tutorials, just click [here]. Also, send me an ask if you have any tutorial request, I’d love to help!