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viivus:

I made a walkthrough of my process for drawing faceted stones! Judging by the timestamps from the screenshots I took, drawing this one stone took an hour and three minutes, although I know I went and checked tumblr a couple times while I was working, so let’s just call it an hour.

Now MISCELLANEOUS NOTES

  • This walkthrough assumes you already know how to use layer masks, the clone stamp, and the lasso tool. There’s also one part where I didn’t label it, but I inverted the selection so I could keep my lines consistent. It’s in the third image.
  • Unfortunately I can’t really help with colour choice and the actual colouring of the pinwheel shape that makes up the back facets, but you can kind of see that I tended to colour with lines that cut across the facets and and kept the outer parts of the facets darker. It would probably be best to find a reference to work from!
  • This particular cut of stone is called the ‘brilliant’ cut.
  • There’s actually a lot of internal reflection business that goes on in a stone, but I elected to ingore all of it since at a distance you can’t really tell anyway.

now GO FORTH AND DAZZLE YOUR FRIENDS WITH YOUR SPARKLE

(via anodymalion)

maid-en-china:

The second part of the cloud tutorial is done :D You can view the full version on my dA. And for the new followers, you can find part 1 here I’ll be working on part three next :3

Here’s the free download to the Photoshop brushes.

I was very happy to see all the beautiful skies people have been painting while using my tutorial :) I hope to make lots of other tutorials on lighting and colors as well. Now I just need time between my busy schedule orz…

_____________

-Full view of sample cloud paintings

-Gif of the tutorial work progress (best viewd in Firefox)

(via anatomicalart)

simonist:

here are some bits from the psg art tutorial by Arne Niklas Jansson

it’s incredibly useful and very comprehensive so please, check it out!

img 1: sub-surface scattering

Sub-surface scattering - Strong light can penetrate the surface of some materials and bounce around, then exit again. This will increase the saturation and make the surface look illuminated from the inside. In the case with human skin, we sometimes see it on hard edges between light and shadow. 

img 2: layer passes

  • Feel volume and angle of the form.
  • Where is the light coming from?
  • Try to figure out if there are any shadows that might be falling on the surface.
  • Is there any reflected light (radiosity) that hits the surface?
  • What is the ambient color of the scene? (sorta like global reflected light.)
  • Any speculars. Is the surface gloss/wet and also angled so it reflects a light source, such as the sky?
  • The exposure level. Perhaps it’s so heavily lit that it becomes more than white? Perhaps it’s so dark that even the brightest spot is hidden in darkness.
  • Is there any fog in the way?
  • The texture of the surface.

Note that this mainly goes for realistic styles. A brushstroke should also look efficient and consistent with the rest of the painting and your color scheme choice. You might also have an idea or style which disallows certain colors or textures and puts priority on other things. However, even in a powerpuff girls illustration there’s simplified elements of realistic rendering. Don’t hide behind “it’s not apart of my style so I’m not gonna learn it”.

img 3: speculars

There’s really just one kind of light. It bounces. You can only see the light (photon) if it enters your eye. Light does two important things when it hits a surface. First, a part of it is absorbed. This is how colors are made. A red apple reflects mostly red wavelengths, the rest are absorbed and turned into heat or something. That’s why black stuff get so hot in the sun. Anyways, the reflected light bounce away differently depending on the surface. If the surface is bumpy it will bounce away sort of randomly, like a tennis ball that hits rocky terrain. If the surface is smooth it will bounce away in a predictable path. A mirror is very smooth so the light comes back undistorted, so we can see our reflection.

Note that all surfaces have speculars, because speculars is just reflected light. It’s just more broken up/diluted on dull surfaces.

img 4: radiosity

Here on earth we have lots of stuff around us that the light can bounce off, so things here are more or less lit from all angles. For example we have the sky which is like a dome shaped blue light source. Then theres the ground, walls and other surfaces. In space there’s basically just one light source, the sun. This is why the moon just has a lit and shadowed side, and looks kind of flat. If you looks carefully however, you can see earthlight on the shadow side of the moon, but it’s very weak. Then there’s starlight, which I guess is even weaker.

When light hits a surface and bounces, it also change color. If it hits another surface of the same color it bounced off, it will make that surface look even more saturated.

(via helpyoudraw)

bumblecake:

painted-bees:

jeanox:

Little nugget of advice that really changed the way I approached painting. When I started blending like this it was a real turning point for my art quality.

Forgot to add that lighting conditions and other variables in a piece make the hardness you want to choose somewhat variable. Drawing things like skin is more of a hardness range than it is a hard rule. 

Eheh…get it? Hard rule? (aaaaaaaaaand i’m done). 

Haa thanks, I can’t even put into words how unappealing the overuse of a soft brush is when rendering. There have even been otherwise expertly painted images that were (in my opinion) ruined by that overly soft ‘airbrush’-y look that soft edged brushes give off. 

I mean, I just really hate soft edged brush in most cases. It’s definitely the fact that you can’t read any real confidence in the brush strokes of a soft edged brush. It makes it really difficult to nail down any solid shapes or forms in your painting. Weak vagueness both in brush strokes and with shape and form is generally not a good thing when painting.

 If I can tell a soft edge brush was used (a lot) in an image, I probably won’t like how it’s been applied.

OH MY GOD THIS

(via ship-captain-cat)

surgencyart:

How I remove white backgrounds from scans.

I can never get the other method to work that I have seen here on some tutorial blogs. So I found another way which is much more simple in my opinion. I am not sure if it will work on later versions of photoshop. I am using the cs5 version. 

Hope this helps someone!

(via syanglau)

learninganatomy:

So, this post will be highlighting the website Proko and how it can help you to improve your life drawing. 

Whether you take life drawing or not, learning how to structure the human form (or animal forms!) Is important to know and master. Proko is a great place to pick up tips and techniques taught by Marshall Vandruff and Stan Prokopenko. The site is free to use and has a bunch of videos that highlight different techniques, along with critique videos and videos that focus on drawing certain areas. (There is a premium service as well, but since I haven’t payed for it, I won’t delve into that.)

This material is fantastic to use whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro. Many of these videos help visualize how to break down the model into shapes by using real models. Remember to keep in mind that there is no ‘right’ way to draw from life, but you can be certain that there is a way for you to feel comfortable when drawing and to get the most out of your figure. 

(via nequius-deactivated20140206)

Getting Started in Digital Art Series Preview by *ConceptCookie
Check out ConceptCookie’s Getting Started tutorial pack for Digital Illustrators.[Link to full series] 

Getting Started in Digital Art Series Preview by *ConceptCookie

Check out ConceptCookie’s Getting Started tutorial pack for Digital Illustrators.

[Link to full series]